Open 2.3.3: Electric Heat Generator IC2 + Logistics Pipes power

Dawenzel

New Member
Jul 29, 2019
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Version:
2.3.3

What is the bug:
So while trying to make refined iron(steel) with the ic2 combo of electric heat generator + blast furnace I tried out power through logistics pipes.

As you can see does the compressor on the bottom right receive power but the electric heat generator does not accept it. I also cant give it power through Immersive engineering connectors + wires.

Mod & Version:


Paste.feed-the-beast.com log:


Can it be repeated:


Known Fix:
 

Dawenzel

New Member
Jul 29, 2019
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There is a LV Power supplier upgrade inside the pipe next to the machine in question.

This is also how I give power to the compressor in the first image.
 
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codewarrior0

Guest
The electric heat generators won't accept power from IE wire connectors, either. They seem to only get power from IC2 wires. I always hook up a transformer to convert from IE to IC2 to power them.

There are a handful of other IC2 machines that only accept power from IC2 wires, electric kinetic generator too I think. Somebody should double check all of them and make a list!
 

Dawenzel

New Member
Jul 29, 2019
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Yes I noticed that too that it won't accept from IE either. Maybe it doesn't have anything specific to do with logistics pipes but that it would be just the machine only accepting power from a ic2 power source.
 

Azzanine

New Member
Jul 29, 2019
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How many elements does the heater have? It may no longer be LV. I was under the impression that with more coils meant escalating power cost.

Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk
 

Dawenzel

New Member
Jul 29, 2019
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The heater has 2 coils in it if that's what you mean. It can hold a total of 10 coils max and the tools tips say that it can consume 0-100 eu/t so it would be 10 eu per coil.
 
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codewarrior0

Guest
It may no longer be LV.
I've noticed that the voltage differences don't seem to matter in IC2 Experimental. I can power all of the purportedly "low voltage" machines with HV wires carrying a thousand EU or more, with no transformer upgrades and several overclocking upgrades.

My usual solution to this problem is to use an IC2 transformer. All of the transformers accept power from IE wire connectors, so they should accept it from the LP power suppliers too. Then connect an IC2 cable to the transformer and power the picky IC2 machines with that.
 

Azzanine

New Member
Jul 29, 2019
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While voltage may not matter to IC2 it's self. It might still matter to Immersive Engineering and Logistics Pipes function.
Try MV or HV card if not just to rule that cause out.

Failing that make the LP pipe power an appropriate Batbox/MFE and have that feed the heater.


Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk
 

Dawenzel

New Member
Jul 29, 2019
7
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My usual solution to this problem is to use an IC2 transformer. All of the transformers accept power from IE wire connectors, so they should accept it from the LP power suppliers too. Then connect an IC2 cable to the transformer and power the picky IC2 machines with that.
Yes that would fix the power conversion part. But in my opinion that shouldn't have to be the case as other ic2 machines (not all) can receive power from LP so why can't these ones.

While voltage may not matter to IC2 it's self. It might still matter to Immersive Engineering and Logistics Pipes function.
Try MV or HV card if not just to rule that cause out.
I'll try this and report back. EDIT: Both MV and HV card didn't make a difference.
 
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codewarrior0

Guest
But in my opinion that shouldn't have to be the case as other ic2 machines (not all) can receive power from LP so why can't these ones.
The two machines I know of that don't accept power are the Electric Kinetic Generator and the Electric Heat Generator. What these machines have in common is that they do not implement the mod API called "IEnergySink", which is what IE wire connectors use to send EU into a machine.

So until IC2 Experimental gets updated to change these machines to support IEnergySink, all we can do is use a workaround with a transformer.
 
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codewarrior0

Guest
its just weird to see someone "implement" an "API".
An excellent question! First, what is an "interface" and how does it differ from an "API"?

An interface is simply the point at which two components connect to each other. For example, a power plug going into a socket, or a cylinder head attaching to an engine block. You can replace the power plug (or the socket) with one from a different vendor, and as long as it conforms to the same interface, it will be compatible with the other part. These interfaces are defined by their physical shape and by measurements such as length, radius, spacing, etc. In this context it's unusual to say something "implements the XYZ power plug interface". You would more commonly hear that something "conforms to the XYZ power plug specification".

"API" is a specific kind of interface. It is the one we use when constructing software - an API, or "application programming interface", is the point at which two software components connect to each other. Interfaces in software don't have a physical form, and instead are defined by the names of entry points and the types of data that pass into and out of the entry points. Because the notion of APIs is enshrined in many programming languages, Java included, it is common to refer to an API as simply an "interface" and say that a particular piece of software "implements" that interface. Indeed, the words "interface" and "implements" are often special keywords in such languages, so you will hear "such-and-such implements the IEnergySink interface". But since "interface" here is a shorthand for "API", you can say the same thing with "such-and-such implements the IEnergySink API".
 

Pyure

Not Totally Useless
Aug 14, 2013
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Waterloo, Ontario
An excellent question! First, what is an "interface" and how does it differ from an "API"?

An interface is simply the point at which two components connect to each other. For example, a power plug going into a socket, or a cylinder head attaching to an engine block. You can replace the power plug (or the socket) with one from a different vendor, and as long as it conforms to the same interface, it will be compatible with the other part. These interfaces are defined by their physical shape and by measurements such as length, radius, spacing, etc. In this context it's unusual to say something "implements the XYZ power plug interface". You would more commonly hear that something "conforms to the XYZ power plug specification".

"API" is a specific kind of interface. It is the one we use when constructing software - an API, or "application programming interface", is the point at which two software components connect to each other. Interfaces in software don't have a physical form, and instead are defined by the names of entry points and the types of data that pass into and out of the entry points. Because the notion of APIs is enshrined in many programming languages, Java included, it is common to refer to an API as simply an "interface" and say that a particular piece of software "implements" that interface. Indeed, the words "interface" and "implements" are often special keywords in such languages, so you will hear "such-and-such implements the IEnergySink interface". But since "interface" here is a shorthand for "API", you can say the same thing with "such-and-such implements the IEnergySink API".
Great thx :p

I've never heard of anyone implementing an API. I write APIs, and they're just a collection of routines.

When I "implement" an Interface, its just OOP jargon: I'm doing what you describe above and generating a hook.
When I "implement" an API, I'm actually just creating an API that someone has spec'd out.

(fwiw I write C# and Node APIs for a living with MSSQL and MySQL back ends. Nothing particularly exciting or sophisticated unless you appreciate that I do it for the hockey industry these days)